GOOD FIX

GOOD FIX

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Saving Lives with Spay/Neuter

Good Fix is a program of Greater Good Charities that deploys specially trained high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter (HQHVSN) surgical teams and professional trapping teams to help control pet overpopulation in communities that need it most, all free of charge. Good Fix also provides vaccination services to owned and community pets, educates community members on the importance of spay/neuter and provides training opportunities for local veterinarians. 

Ultimately, Good Fix reduces human-animal conflict and the burden on animal shelters to euthanize unwanted pets.

up to 800
Surgeries
Per Day
100+
Litters Prevented By Spaying/Neutering One Cat Or Dog
$20
Average Cost To Sterilize
One Cat Or Dog

"Fixing" The Issue of Overpopulation

Greater Good Charities has worked in Hawaii for years by providing grants and critical supplies to people and pets in need. In 2020, Greater Good Charities worked with the state of Hawaii to conduct Paws Across the Pacific, the largest pet airlift in history, saving nearly 600 shelter dogs and cats!

Now, beginning October 2021, our Good Fix program is headed to Kauai to address the issue of cat overpopulation on the island. Our effort in Kauai will work to stem community cat overpopulation, spay/neuter owned cats to control unwanted litters, and provide supplies and training to shelters and community members to improve outcomes for cats across the island.

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DONATE TO SAVE LIVES

Good Fix offers its services to communities in need free of charge and is only possible thanks to donors like you. The impact is real: Greater Good Charities believes high-quality, high-volume sterilization combined with strategic trapping efforts is the most effective and humane method of dog/cat population control and lives saved per dollar. It costs just $20 to sterilize a cat or dog, preventing hundreds of unwanted kittens or puppies.

Your tax-deductible gift will support these life saving efforts and prevent unneeded suffering.

Our Clinics
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Rosebud Sioux Tribe Reservation

In addition to Kauai, Good Fix is working on native lands to control community dog and cat populations, starting with the Rosebud Sioux Tribe Reservation. 

When our Rescue Rebuild program helped remodel the Helping Animal Center at the Rosebud reservation to provide wellness services for reservation resident pets, on-site spay and neuter assistance was a pressing need.

By providing free spay and neuter services for dogs and cats in partnership with Sovereign Nations Veterinary, Good Fix now performs free, high-volume spay/neuter clinics at the center which allows the center to allocate its scarce resources towards the establishment of other veterinary services.

Stay tuned for more Good Fix clinic announcements!

Our Partners and Sponsors

Good Fix is only possible thanks to donors like you and our generous partners and sponsors.

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Boehringer Ingelheim logo
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Are you an animal welfare nonprofit in need?
FOod grants

Rescue Bank provides grants to the animal rescue community in the form of donated pet food, delivered through our network of regional affiliates. We pay to ship the products directly from the donor to the affiliate’s warehouse. Affiliates then distribute these grants to pre-qualified recipients based on demonstrated need and verified census.

Pet food grants allow rescue organizations to transfer part of their food budget to much-needed services such as spay/neuter, vet services, facility maintenance or improvement, adoption events, etc.

Please select the appropriate application below to be considered for a pet food grant.

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Rescue group application

An “Eligible Rescue” rescues and provides shelter and care for animals that have been abused, injured, abandoned or are otherwise in need.

An “Eligible Rescue” shall meet the following criteria:

  • 501(c) 3 status described in Section 170(b)(1)(A)(vi), Internal Revenue Code 1986, and its subsequent amendments
  • No breeding of animals occurs
  • All animals shall be housed in a clean, comfortable, safe, species-appropriate, stimulating and enriching environment
  • Spay or neuter all animals prior to adoption
  • Must demonstrate a respect for quality of life and provide the most humane death possible for animals who are suffering or otherwise not suitable for adoption
  • Has a sufficient number of qualified employees/ volunteers to provide the appropriate level of care for the animals
  • Must have a comprehensive and effective adoption program
  • Must have a means to independently verify the number of pets available for adoption (e.g., Petfinder page, adoption website), so that equitable distribution of food can be determined
  • Must demonstrate need (e.g., limited financial resources) and fiscal responsibility
  • Must demonstrate a positive contribution to the community’s animal welfare resource, including positive relationships with peers
Animal shelter application

An “Eligible Animal Shelter” rescues and provides shelter and care for animals that have been abused, injured, abandoned or are otherwise in need.

An “Eligible Animal Shelter” shall meet the following criteria:

  • 501(c) 3 status described in Section 170(b)(1)(A)(vi), Internal Revenue Code 1986, and its subsequent amendments
  • No breeding of animals occurs
  • All animals shall be housed in a clean, comfortable, safe, species appropriate, stimulating and enriching environment
  • Spay or neuter all animals prior to adoption
  • Must demonstrate a respect for quality of life and provide the most humane death possible for animals who are suffering or otherwise not suitable for adoption
  • Has a sufficient number of qualified employees/ volunteers to provide the appropriate level of care for the animals
  • Must have a comprehensive and effective adoption program
  • Must have a means to independently verify the number of pets available for adoption (e.g., Petfinder page, adoption website), so that equitable distribution of food can be determined.
  • Must demonstrate need (e.g., limited financial resources) and fiscal responsibility
  • Must demonstrate a positive contribution to the community’s animal welfare resource, including positive relationships with peers
Feral cat related application

An “Eligible Feral Cat Related Organization” is committed to improving the lives of feral and homeless cats.

An “Eligible Feral Cat Related Organization” shall meet the following criteria:

  • 501(c) 3 status described in Section 170(b)(1)(A)(vi), Internal Revenue Code 1986, and its subsequent amendments
  • Actively participates in a “TNRF” Trap-Neuter-Return-Feed program as a long-term solution in controlling feral cat populations.
  • Educates the public about the plight of stray and feral cats and the need to spay/neuter pets
  • Must demonstrate need (e.g., limited financial resources) and fiscal responsibility
  • Must demonstrate a positive contribution to the community’s animal welfare resource, including positive relationships with peers
disaster/emergency aid application

Working with Greater Good Charities, Rescue Bank provides assistance in disaster and emergency situations. The very nature of an emergency makes setting strict criteria difficult. Each event will be evaluated by Greater Good Charities, Rescue Bank, our donors, and the nearest affiliate organization. We may temporarily suspend some of our recipient criteria to provide emergency relief. However, a group’s ability to work collaboratively will remain as a key qualification. We provide pet food and supplies in the following situations:

  • Local, regional, and nationally-declared natural or man-made disasters (e.g. hurricanes, floods, fires)
  • Multiple-animal rescues such as law enforcement actions
food bank application

An “Eligible Pet Food Bank” is a community based organization serving as a resource for local individuals and families struggling to provide care for their pets. These are typically food banks, pantries or social service agencies with multiple assistance programs (e.g., rent assistance, elder care, animals on wheels).

An “Eligible Pet Food Bank” shall meet the following criteria:

  • 501(c) 3 status described in Section 170(b)(1)(A)(vi), Internal Revenue Code 1986, and its subsequent amendments
  • Must demonstrate fiscal responsibility and has successfully completed their most recent audit or independent review
  • Has publicized screening and reporting capabilities that meet a generally-recognized standard for providing welfare assistance, such as State and Federal guidelines or Feeding America recommendations. 
  • And recipients...
    1. Agree that pets are for companionship and not for breeding or illegal activities
    2. Agree to maintain pets in a healthy condition
    3. Agree to not sell or return product

  • Verifies recipients’ pets are spayed or neutered and provides spay or neuter education or information to those recipients whose pets are unaltered
  • Has a sufficient number of qualified employees/ volunteers to provide the appropriate level of tracking and verifying need of applicants/recipients
  • Must have an active website with information regarding the pet food program and instructions on how to apply
  • Must have a means to independently verify “proof of need” whether it be through various means such as income, social security, etcetera
  • Must demonstrate a positive contribution to the community’s animal welfare resource, including positive relationships with peers
  • Must have appropriate storage facility or warehouse that meets reasonable standards established by our donors, By way of example, please review our Warehouse Inspection Report.
DOG/CAT sanctuary application

An “Eligible Dog / Cat Sanctuary” rescues and provides shelter and care for animals that have been abused, injured, abandoned or are otherwise in need.

An “Eligible Dog / Cat Sanctuary” shall meet the following criteria:

  • 501(c) 3 status described in Section 170(b)(1)(A)(vi), Internal Revenue Code 1986, and its subsequent amendments
  • No breeding of animals occurs, must spay or neuter all animals residing in sanctuary
  • Veterinary care is provided as appropriate
  • All animals shall be housed in a clean, comfortable, safe, species-appropriate, stimulating and enriching environment
  • Must demonstrate a respect for quality of life and provide the most humane death possible for animals who are suffering
  • Has a sufficient number of qualified employees/ volunteers to provide the appropriate level of care for the animals
  • Must have a comprehensive and effective adoption program for animals who are “adoptable”
  • Must agree to periodic site visits to verify the number and condition of pets in their care.
  • Must demonstrate need (e.g., limited financial resources) and fiscal responsibility
  • Must demonstrate a positive contribution to the community’s animal welfare resource, including positive relationships with peers
grants for Shelter supplies

Rescue Bank expanded! In 2017, we began a program called Supplies for Shelters. This program allows us to provide grants of various supplies such as veterinary products, enrichment toys, beds, blankets, and more. We are still committed to helping smaller, less visible animal welfare organizations. However, this program also includes larger organizations and municipal shelters.

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Minimum requirements to apply:

-No breeding of animals.
-All animals shall be housed in a clean, comfortable, safe, species appropriate, stimulating and enriching environment.
-Spay or neuter all animals before adoption.
-Must demonstrate a respect for quality of life and provide the most humane death possible for animals who are suffering or otherwise not suitable for adoption.
-Have a sufficient number of qualified employees/volunteers to provide the appropriate level of care for the animals.
-Must have a comprehensive and effective adoption program.
-Must demonstrate a positive contribution to the community’s animal welfare resource, including positive relationships with peers.

If you would like to apply for a Supplies for Shelters grant, please fill out the form below. We will be in touch if your application is approved.
Questions?

Make sure to check out our FAQ page for more information. If you still have questions, please email info@rescuebank.org.

Become a Medical Volunteer

Good Fix is looking for veterinarians, veterinary technicians/assistants, and other veterinary professionals to volunteer at our clinics! If you enjoy working as a team & improving the lives of pets and pet owners read more about volunteer roles and apply below!

Medical Crew Volunteer Duties

Vet Technicians and Assistants:

  • Assist with physical exams, pre-medication and induction of anesthesia, surgical preparation, anesthesia monitoring, pack & prep of instruments, assisting with recovery, and assisting the surgeons as needed. 
  • Helpful technical skills: placing intravenous catheters, administering medications, intubation, surgical prep, and anesthesia monitoring,

Veterinarians:

  • Perform HQHV canine and feline spay/neuter surgeries (40-80 per day)
  • Perform physical examinations or assist in recovery of patients based on areas in need during the clinic.

Spanish speakers are occasionally needed on clinics, depending on location. Spanish speaking volunteers who can effectively communicate will be utilized for: owner communication & translation, and education efforts in addition to medical duties.

Local and/or out-of-area volunteers are always welcome to volunteer – even if they are not veterinary medical professionals.  Duties can include supervised assistance with patient recovery, patient intake and discharge, community outreach, and other activities based on your level of knowledge and experience.

All volunteers will be utilized in areas where their skills will provide the most benefit for the success of the clinic. The clinic days can be long and strenuous. Please recognize that our goal is efficiency and safety for patients, volunteers, crew and all participants involved.

Costs
  • Air travel, lodging, food costs, and local transportation will be covered for all medical crew members

  • All volunteers are required to be fully vaccinated for Covid-19 prior to consideration

  • Additional immunizations are recommended but not required: Rabies vaccination (3-vaccine series) with current titer, hepatitis, and tetanus

meet the team

Good Fix is a program of Greater Good Charities, and is led by two veterinary professionals,
Dr. Ruth Parkin and Laura Littlebear, who have been successfully executing high-quality,
high-volume spay/neuter (HQHVSN) since 2002. The surgical teams used
by Good Fix are powered by the ViDAS volunteer network, which has worked with
Dr. Parkin and Laura since 2002 on HQHVSN projects.

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Dr. Ruth Parkin

Dr. Ruth Parkin grew up on a small family farm in the US Pacific Northwest and attended University of Washington in Seattle for her undergraduate degree in economics. She attended veterinary school at Colorado State University, where, as a second-year veterinary student she co-founded ViDAS, an organization which travels internationally to hold free high-volume, high-quality spay/neuter services in underprivileged areas. ViDAS has performed over 40,000 sterilizations and is now a part of the Greater Good Charities programs.

Professionally, Dr. Parkin was in clinical practice for over 10 years and was medical director of a clinic in Denver for several years. She has also worked as a relief veterinarian and spay/neuter surgeon in Colorado and in the Portland, OR area and has traveled to Thailand and South Africa to teach veterinary science through a study abroad program. She is currently the Veterinary Medical Director at Greater Good Charities and of the Good Fix program currently kicking off in Kauai. Dr. Parkin's personal interests include playing volleyball, travel, outdoors, and relaxing anywhere there is some sunshine and a baseball game to watch.

Laura Littlebear

Born and raised in Oklahoma, Laura has worked in the veterinary industry for over 20 years.  She previously served as Director of Operations for The Humane Society of the United States and focused primarily on the Spayathon for Puerto Rico program.  She has volunteered with ViDAS (Veterinarios Internacionales Dedicados a Animales Sanos) and served as the Vice President for the past 12 years. Laura’s work with ViDAS inspired her focus and expertise in establishing and providing high quality/high volume spay and neuter in underserved areas.  

She has a passion for animal welfare and improving the lives of pets and the people that surround them. Her personal and professional goals center around spay and neuter advocacy, education and sustainment.  Laura joined Greater Good Charities as the Director of the Good Fix program in May 2021.

Laura resides in Oklahoma with her husband Tommy, their two dogs, Luna and Izzy and three cats, Gus, Sammi and Swampy.  She has two human children,  Morgan and Justin.  She enjoys time outdoors and travelling. 

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John Peaveler

John Peaveler is an animal welfare professional with over 17 years of global experience, in the field of stray animal management, animal population management, disaster response, and animal handling and capture. He began his career in 2004 rescuing dogs and building an animal shelter and wildlife sanctuary in Kuwait along with his wife, Ayeshah Al-Humaidhi, which they ran together for 11 years. He has extensive experience in international and US disaster and cruelty response as well as free-roaming popluation management programs. John has also taught animal handling and capture training around the world, with a goal of helping handlers stay humane in all environments. John serves as the Director, FIeld Operations, overseeing and supporting a range of Great Good Charities programs.

Morgan Littlebear

Morgan was born and raised in Oklahoma and has been involved in animal welfare for the past 5 years.  She began volunteering for ViDAS in 2017, where she fell in love with high quality/high volume (HQHV) spay and neuter. This experience led her to a role as the Executive Director at a large shelter in her home state, where she developed and implemented a HQHV spay neuter program, managed animal transport flights, and assisted in multiple cruelty cases. 

Morgan enjoys the outdoors and spending time with friends and family. She currently resides in Stillwater, Oklahoma with her dog Rosie, her cat, Oscar Martinez, and her boyfriend, Jared.  

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Frequently Asked Questions
What does HQHVSN mean, and is it safe?

HQHVSN is defined as “high-quality, high-volume, spay/neuter”. It is safe (high-quality) and effective (high-volume). Good Fix uses the highest standards of safety, medical and professionalism, including: 1) Expert HQHVSN veterinary surgical teams 2) High-quality veterinary equipment to maximize efficiency and safety for patients and staff. 3) Best practices via Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV) spay/neuter guidelines for surgery procedures, including sterilization ID via tattoo and/or ear tips.

How does Good Fix decide how best to help a community?
Good Fix takes a holistic approach by meeting with and listening to local communities as well as conducting a survey to identify potential areas for optimum success before setting a plan in motion. Good Fix aims to make an effective long-term plan for each community they help that is as agreeable as possible to everyone on the ground at the public, city, county, and state level.
How many surgeries does Good Fix complete?
Each community’s needs are different, so Good Fix’s approach includes a full examination of the local needs, including conducting surveys, interviews and meetings with locals community leaders and other tactics to gauge the appropriate crew size and target surgery number.  Multiple rounds of HQHVSN clinics are conducted to maximize effectiveness and impact.  Our full scale teams have the capacity to perform up to 800 surgeries per day, but often smaller teams can make a bigger impact.
Why is Good Fix needed?

Many communities do not have the resources to perform the type of HQHVSN needed to effectively and humanely control unwanted animal populations. Unfortunately, in some areas, unwanted community pets are exterminated--we believe this inhumane treatment of animals is unacceptable and HQHVSN is the humane answer. 

Good Fix provides spay and neuter services including TNR (trap, neuter, return) for community dogs/cats to keep pet populations within sustainable levels. Good Fix helps communities we serve by off-setting costs that local pet shelter, rescue, and community programs incur each year.

In short, we believe High-quality, high-volume (HQHV) sterilization combined with TNR (Trap, Neuter, Return) is the most effective means of dog/cat population control and lives saved per dollar.

WHY IS GOOD FIX NEEDED IN HAWAII?

Hawaii's overpopulation of community cats is an ongoing problem. Unsterilized community cats can impact Hawaii’s unique wildlife, and overburden animal shelters.

Good Fix provides high-quality, high-volume (HQHV) sterilization combined with TNR (Trap, Neuter, Return) as a solution. Greater Good Charities believes this is the most effective and humane method of cat population control and lives saved per dollar.

This program will help the communities of Hawaii by offsetting costs that local pet shelter, rescue, and TNR programs incur each year. Reduction of community in Hawaii cat populations in Hawaii will also reduce predations of indigenous native bird species.

HOW DOES GOOD FIX WORK IN HAWAII?

Good Fix works with local communities locals to create an effective and sustainable plan for the islands at the public, city, county, and state levels.

To get started, our team will conduct a survey to identify potential areas for impact as well as a professional community cat count to use as a baseline.

Recent Clinics

The latest Good Fix mass sterilization clinic dates in Hawaii:

Gay & Robinson Inc.
February 2—4, 2022
1 Kaumakani Avenue
Kaumakani, HI 96747

KCCP Mobile Site
February 6—8, 2022
Anahola Marketplace
4523 Ioane Road
Lihue, HI 96766

Important information about our upcoming clinics:
  • Registration and drop-off will begin on site at 8 AM and will continue until 2 PM OR until capacity is reached (whichever comes first).
  • All patients will be registered on a first come, first served basis.
  • For your safety and the safety of others, please follow all posted placards at the clinic site.
  • We ask that owners stay in their vehicle and remain masked throughout the registration and drop off process.
  • Cats must be in functional carriers with a useable door. Only one cat is allowed per carrier. Hard-sided carriers are preferred for patient safety and comfort.
  • Please alert staff at time of drop off if cat is known to be currently nursing kittens.
  • We will provide discharge and pick-up information at the time of registration.
  • PLEASE NOTE: All pets receiving services today will be microchipped, as required by state law, if they are not previously chipped.

For more information, contact us at goodfix@greatergood.org or call or call 808-977-2860

Past Clinics

Ahuimanu Shopping Center
October 3–8, 2021
2555 Ala Namahana
Kilauea, HI 96754

Kauai Humane Society
October 11–16, 2021
3-825 Kaumuali Hwy
Lihue, HI 96766

Molokai Humane Society
December 8—11, 2021
3104 Mauna Loa Hwy
Ho'olehua, HI 96729, HI